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Free // Talks  

Changing Tides

A discussion that delves deeper into our collective relationship with water and humanizes stories straight from the headlines

Major Media Partner



Supported by

June 16, 2019

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There is no denying that climate change is real, and if don’t turn our attention to shifting our actions, things will only get worse for our neighbours in the North.

Following on from the themes of Kiinalik: These Sharp Tools, this discussion delves deeper into our collective relationship with water as we humanize some of the headlines seen in the news. Artists working with water and Indigenous community leaders will share how the western lifestyle impacts the rest of the world, and will ask what our collective responsibility looks like in the future.

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Prior to this forum will be a screening of Angry Inuk, a documentary film on the effects of seal hunting on Northern communities as part of Luminato's Illuminating Ideas series. 
 
Changing Tides  image

Changing Tides

A discussion that delves deeper into our collective relationship with water and humanizes stories straight from the headlines

Buy Tickets

Select a performance

Performance: Sunday, June 16, 2019
4:00 PM - 5:15 PM
Studio Theatre, Harbourfront Centre
Seats Going Fast! Buy Book Now Sold Out

Artists

Moderator - Amran Abocar
Moderator Amran Abocar
Moderator - Amran Abocar
Moderator
Amran Abocar

Amran Abocar is Reuters’ Canada Bureau Chief and Global Mining Editor. Prior to her current role, she worked in Asia as Deputy Commodities Editor and in the Middle East, as Gulf Deputy Bureau Chief, covering everything from Dubai's debt implosion and the Arab Spring to nationalist mining policies in Indonesia.

Panelist - Amy Sharrocks
Panelist Amy Sharrocks
Panelist - Amy Sharrocks
Panelist
Amy Sharrocks

Amy Sharrocks is a live artist, sculptor and film-maker who invites people to come on journeys in which their own experience, communication and expression are a vital part. Her work gives careful consideration to the impact we have on each other and the world. For 10 years she has been investigating people and our relationship to water: floating boats on swimming pools, swimming across London, dowsing rivers and gathering donations for Museum of Water. Museum of Water was in Somerset House for summer 2014, has since toured to over 50 locations worldwide, and has been visited by over 65,000 people. The Museum has spent two years in The Netherlands and Western Australia and was nominated for European Museum of the Year 2016. 2018-19 saw the first major survey of Sharrocks’ work take place, at Leamington Spa Art Gallery & Museum, collecting photographs, sculptures, drawings, sonic and live works together from over a decade of making. In 2014 Amy was one of 10 artists selected for Museums at Night; in 2015 she was shortlisted for the Arts Foundation Fellowship Award. In 2017 she organised the Fry’s Island Swim, a swim for 80 in the Thames River in the heart of Reading, and is currently encouraging people to sign up to Swim the Thames, a swim across the river in London. She has just written against dryness, about the experience of water and cities.

 


 
Panelist - Sunshine Tenasco
Panelist Sunshine Tenasco
Panelist - Sunshine Tenasco
Panelist
Sunshine Tenasco

Sunshine Tenasco is a First Nations mommy of four funny kids from Kitigan Zibi Anishinabeg. She is a social entrepreneur who believes that business is an exciting place where people can create positive change. Sunshine recently launched Her Braids, which is a business that aims to create awareness about the issues of clean drinking water in First Nations communities through beaded pendants.  Her Braids has committed to donating 10% of their profits to the David Suzuki Foundations, The Blue Dot movement. She is also the CEO of Pow Wow Pitch, which aims to give Indigenous entrepreneurs the platform to showcase their entrepreneurial endeavors and a chance to win start up cash and mentorship.  Sunshine hopes to help cultivate the culture of entrepreneurship in Indigenous communities.

 

Cast placeholder image
Panelist Clayton Thomas-Muller
Panelist
Clayton Thomas-Muller