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Same as it ever was: Thoughts beyond Out the Window

Policing People: Society and the Justice System

This forum will consider the current status of police training, the justice system, and what we can do to build a more supportive society.

Presented by
FREE EVENT
June 23 , 2018

4:30 PM

FREE to Out the Window ticket holders and the general public. Members of the public are welcome to join on a first come, first served basis.
Three forums responding to Liza Balkan's Out the Window. Three essential conversations, grounded in the lived experiences of Torontonians that are relevant far beyond the city's limits. Join us to learn what's really going on and how we can be catalysts for change, together. 

We've seen the headlines: an encounter between the police and a citizen turns aggressive and ends in tragedy. There are too many cracks in the relationship between police and the people whom they have vowed to protect. This forum will look for real answers to hard questions. Are our police receiving the training they need to respond in the moment? Does modern policing practice reflect the realities of contemporary Toronto? Why does the justice system so often leave us questioning its definition of justice and the apparent absence of accountability?

John Sewell, former mayor of Toronto and member of the Toronto Police Accountability Coalition, is one member of this forum convened to consider the current status of police training, the justice system, and what we can do to build a more supportive society.
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Panelists

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John Sewell
John Sewell
John Sewell was a member of Toronto City Council from 1969 to 1984, and was  Mayor of Toronto 1979 – 80. He has engaged in politics in Toronto as a community activist, city councillor, journalist, writer, housing administrator, and social entrepreneur. He has authored a dozen books. He was awarded the Order of Canada in 2005.
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Mike Federico
Mike Federico
Mike Federico retired as Deputy Chief from the Toronto Police Service in 2017 after 45 years of service.
 He led the police response to persons with mental health issues.  He oversaw the development and implementation of policy, programs, training, and accountability.  He was instrumental in establishing an emphasis in policing on the preservation of life, reflected in the Toronto Police Service phrase “Zero Harm, Zero Bias”.
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Keith Merith
Keith Merith
Keith Merith is a retired police Superintendent having served 31 years with the York Regional Police Service (YRP). Superintendent Merith has held command positions in Information Services, Court Services, Corporate Development, Intelligence, Special Services Bureau and Organized Crime Bureau.
Merith served two terms as president of the Association of Black Law Enforcers (A.B.L.E.) which focused on advocating for members operating within the Criminal Justice System. He is also the co-founder of the Citizenship Initiative Group (GIG), an organization that assists permanent residents to apply for and receive Canadian Citizenship.
Superintendent Merith holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Criminal Justice Studies and is a graduate of the Rotmans School of Business Police Leadership Program.
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Idil Abdillahi - Moderator
Idil Abdillahi - Moderator
Idil Abdillahi is an Assistant Professor in the School of Social Work at Ryerson University. As a critical interdisciplinary scholar, she has published on a wide array of topics such as: mental health, poverty, HIV/AIDS, organizational development, and several other key policy areas at the intersection of Black life and state interruption. Most notably, Idil’s cutting-edge research and scholarship on anti-Black sanism has informed the current debates on fatal police shootings of Black Mad identified peoples. Recently, her theorizing helped inform the inquest of Andrew Loku, one among the litany of Black men fatally killed by Police Services in the Greater Toronto Area. She comes to this work with over 15 years of direct practice experience in the social service sector. Idil has been a frontline social worker, supervisor, clinical educator and has also been in leadership and governance roles.  Her lengthy history as a practitioner in clinical, forensic and grassroots settings, led to her being honoured with several awards and accolades for her work in mental health in Toronto. Upon transitioning to the academy in 2011, Idil was nominated as a “Professor Who Made a Mark” and she later won the prestigious Viola Desmond Award, celebrating the achievements of strong Black Canadian Women in 2015. Idil is a community organizer, strategist, public intellectual and academic, unapologetically committed to the freedom, fight and joy for Black lives in this city, province and country.